Come Tumbling Down by Seanan McGuire | Book Review

★★★☆☆
January 12th – 15th

I was so excited for this book. This is the fifth installment in the Wayward Children series, and seems to be a direct sequel to the third and first books (which I didn’t like) containing the characters from the second book (which are my favorites). I’m I’m unfortunately finding a pattern with this series that I only like every other book, which isn’t fun.

Luckily, they’re short enough that I can get through them, but we’ll get into what’s actually happening here.

Following the events of the first book, Jack and Jill return to the Moors. At the start of this book, we see Jack return, passed out in the arms of Alexis, her reanimated girlfriend. But Jack doesn’t seem to be fully Jack. Instead, she’s in Jill’s body.

Part of my problem with this book is that it had a quest storyline, similar to the third book, that takes place in one of the worlds. While the quests sound fun in theory, there just isn’t enough time to flesh out the stakes and consequences, and as a result there are no stakes or consequences. The people she brings along to help her don’t even end up helping her, as she does all of the work themselves. The most they do is act against her and make it more difficult for her to continue. Even the culmination of the book, the final battle which will help Jack get her body back, is wrapped up within a few pages.

This book also contains characters I find very hard to deal with, and McGuire’s style of bouncing around to what each character is feeling can be hard to follow. The characters repeat themselves, or justify their actions verbally, because there isn’t enough time for their character arcs to do it for them. In addition, we’re constantly met with “back when she saved her world” or “when he defeated the monster in his own world”, and it feels a lot like we’ve missed out on some really fun adventure stories and are stuck.

At the end of the book, we barely get a reaction from the characters once they’ve returned to the school. Cora especially, who you actually saw struggle with being in another world and returning, doesn’t even say or do anything at the end, and we’re left to wonder if she’s going to be okay mentally after the toll The Moors took on her.

My favorite of these books have been the second and fourth books, which concentrated on one character finding their doors and going into their world. McGuire seems to do better with a smaller scope, and I hope she’ll give us more of these prequel stories in the future, as the quest storylines at the school aren’t doing it for me.

-Siobhan

Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi | Book Series Review

★★★★☆
May 21st

I don’t know a lot about “modern” history. Anything after World War II and I’m totally lost. I’m not typically one for politics or war or revolution. I especially don’t know a lot about Iran. It’s something that I’m working to try and learn about. This series was fascinating to me. Satrapi’s history is complex and important, and is filled with the types of struggles I’m so lucky to have never come across in my life.

Persepolis is an autobiographical graphic novel which follows Marjane Satrapi’s life growing up in Iran at the beginning of the Iranian Revolution, her time living in Austria during the Iran/Iraq war, and then her return to Iran following the war after high school. The style is simple and compliments the story well. It reminded me a lot of Maus in tone: somber but hopeful for the future.

I cannot fathom what it was like for her to live through bombing raids. I can’t imagine living abroad while your family and friends are still at home. I can’t imagine being forced to wear clothes that you don’t want to wear, or say things you don’t want to say. There’s so much in this graphic novel that’s put into perspective that it’s astounding. This graphic novel was tough to read at times, but was really important.

Even now, I’m having trouble finding the words to say how important I think this was, because it feels like everything I have to say pales in comparison. These are powerful volumes, and I really think that more people should read this series. I’m definitely glad that I did.

-Siobhan