Bunny by Mona Awad | Book Review

★★★☆☆
February 2nd – 6th

I have… no idea what I just read. This book was pitched to me as Heathers meets The Craft with horror elements. I was expecting Horror with a capital H. What Bunny left me with was a surrealist commentary on writing that ended up becoming exactly what it was making fun of. Maybe that’s the point and I didn’t “get it”, but who knows.

Here’s the thing: I love horror, but I’m really picky. When I think horror, I want a sense of dread. I want high stakes that the reader can feel. I want a sinister presence, paranormal or not, that keeps me turning each page. I didn’t get that at all with Bunny. It had some gore, some body modification and general weird-ness, but not that full horror that I expected. I think that this is a very horror-lite experience.

Bunny is a book about Samantha Heather Mackey, a senior in an elite creative writing program. She’s a loner, with only the company of her friend Ava to help her through the difficulties of her program. Then there are the Bunnies, a clique of girls who share Samantha’s program, and who affectionately refer to each other as Bunny.

This book used the word Bunny every other sentence, at least, and the writing style was definitely something that I had to get used to. It’s full of italicized versions of what the Bunnies or thinking, or really what Samantha thinks the Bunnies are thinking. (You’re so amazing Bunny. You too, Bunny. So amazing. So.)

One of the quotes in the book I think sums up my experience reading it perfectly:


This makes no sense. This is coy and this is willfully obscure and no one but [the author] will ever get this […] spoiled, fragmented, lazy, pretentious […] And then I feel like screaming JUST SAY IT. TELL ME WHAT HAPPENED. TELL ME WHAT THE F*CK THIS MEANS

When I read this character’s quote I felt like I read the entire summary of Bunny. Again, maybe this is supposed to be the point of the book. I feel like this is the type of book to go into blind and without any preconceived notions of what’s happening in here. I won’t go into the full plot or mystical element to the book, but my favorite part of the book is that it’s one big metaphor for authors needing to “kill their darlings”, which is referenced multiple times.

Overall, it was okay. It’s definitely not like anything I’ve ever read before, but ultimately I felt that Bunny became what it was seeking to parody.

-Siobhan

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